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David Basse - Uptown
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David Basse - Uptown

25-03-2016, 18:21
Jazz | Vocal Jazz

Title: Uptown
Year Of Release: 2009
Label: Cafe Pacific
Genre: Jazz / Vocal Jazz
Quality: Mp3 / 320kbps
Total Time: 52:03 min
Total Size: 118 MB

01. Uptown
02. Something Fried
03. 52nd & Broadway
04. Like Jazz
05. You Won't Hear Me Say Goodbye
06. Living Without You
07. Slow Boat To China
08. Parker's Mood
09. Bidin' My Time
10. Traffic Jam
11. But Anyhow The Blues Don't Care
12. I've Got The World On A String

David Basse: vocals; Phil Woods: alto saxophone; Mike Melvoin: piano; Steve Gilmore: bass; Bill Goodwin: drums.

West Coast singer Mark Winkler (Sweet Spot [Cafe Pacific Records, 2011]) heard David Basse and immediately signed him to his Cafe Pacific Records. Uptown is the first product of this partnership and, for the sake of the male jazz singer, does not come a moment too soon. There exists a huge disparity between female and male singers singing "serious" jazz. For the sake of context, the serious male jazz singers include Mark Murphy and Jon Hendricks (both in the autumn of their spectacular careers) as well as Kurt Elling and Andy Bey (still vital). The vast majority of what passes for as male jazz singers are more cabaret singers, the finest ones including Jim Caruso (The Swing Set [Yellow Sound Music, 2011]) and the aforementioned Winkler.

Basse has one of those confident yet moody voices that totally lacks self-consciousness, something necessary for jazz vocals. His recital on Uptown is a compelling collection of standards and originals tending toward a more conservative (read that: mainstream) vein of vocal performance. However, Basse is not afraid to take on King Pleasure and his brilliant adaptation of Charlie Parker's "Parker's Mood." In doing so, Basse pays special homage to those artists and the art of vocalese, a dying art in competency. Add the presence of Parker scholar Phil Woods and a sublime performance emerges. A perfect union of the blues in jazz, Woods introduces the piece with a chorus of the real thing. Pianist Mike Melvoin and Woods get grand solo space and proceed to show why this "old music" is so important. Basse plays things pretty straight without harnessing the ebullient personality of Pleasure, Parker, the blues, or jazz. ~C. Michael Bailey

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frav10   User offline   26 March 2016 08:47

Thank's from Israel 3

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