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String Driven Thing – The Machine That Cried (1973) [Remastered]

19-06-2014, 09:24
Music | World | Folk | Rock | FLAC / APE

String Driven Thing – The Machine That Cried (1973) [Remastered]

Artist: String Driven Thing
Title Of Album: The Machine That Cried
Year Of Release: 1996
Label: Ozit Records OZ 0021
Genre: Progressive Folk Rock
Quality: MP3 | FLAC
Bitrate: VBR 0 | 16Bit/44kHz
Total Size: 99 MB | 375 MB
Total Time: 63:00
Website: Discogs

01. Heartfeeder 06:40
02. To See You 03:58
03. Night Club 05:05
04. Sold Down The River 04:29
05. Two Timin Rama 03:11
06. Travelling 02:55
07. People On The Street 06:03
08. The House 02:37
09. The Machine That Cried 05:20
10. River Of Sleep 11:12
11. If Only The Good 04:26
12. It's A Game 03:36
13. Part Of The City 03:33

Chris Adams: guitars, vocals
Pauline Adams: vocals, percussion
Grahame Smith: violin, viola
Colin Wilson: bass, guitars, banjo
Billy Fairley: drums, congas

Review from Q Review – January 1997:
Fondly remembered, if only by a select few, String Driven Thing were Scottish progressive rockers whose appeal rested largely on the scrapings of their classically trained violinist, Grahame Smith. Nothing jaunty or celtic, mind, his style was almost Mogadon morose. With leader Chris Adams supplying the suitably dark and troubled musings, their crowning moment came in 1973 with "The Machine that Cried". Charisma, their label at the time, considered it a little too grim for public consumption and forced a few key changes. This, though, is the band's own restored version and a fine, creepy period piece it is too, never more so than on Heartfeeder and the epic, if flawed, River of Sleep, which was cut to ribbons first time around.

From the biography on Allmusic:
One of the finest bands signed to the Charisma label during its early-'70s heyday, Scotland's String Driven Thing originally formed as a trio in 1969, led by the husband-and-wife team of Chris and Pauline Adams, plus percussionist John Mannion. Locally popular at the tail end of the 1960s, the band faded from view shortly after releasing a self-titled debut album in 1970. They continued playing, however, with the lineup expanding to include bassist Colin Wilson .
The band continued pushing forward. Visiting France, they stopped by the renowned Chateau D'Heuroville studios (the Honky Chateau of Elton John fame), where they were filmed recording some songs with a French producer, who later claimed he'd done a better job than Shel Talmy ("he had a point," mused Adams); December 1972, meanwhile, saw the band fly to New York to support Genesis at that band's first ever American show, at the Philharmonic Hall.
String Driven Thing's rise ought to have been inexorable. Their latest single, "Circus," was making waves on both sides of the Atlantic, and plans were afoot for the group to join Genesis on their own latest tours of both Britain and the U.S. Unfortunately, the beginning of 1973 saw Chris Adams hospitalized with a collapsed lung, an event that was to have a serious impact on String Driven Thing's future.
That experience, and the nightmare of the next week's worth of agonizing recuperation was to form the inspiration for much of The Machine That Cried, String Driven Thing's next album. However, although the band did make it onto the British dates, the American shows never happened; instead, the band found itself shunting up and down the British highway system, playing small clubs and universities, and breaking in the new material.
String Driven Thing returned to the studio to record The Machine That Cried, alongside what remains their best-known number, the single "It's a Game." The LP has since been acclaimed not merely String Driven Thing's masterpiece, but one of the finest progressive rock albums of the entire era – its CD reissue on the British Ozit label was widely heralded as among the most intelligent re-releases of recent years, and the excitement that greeted the re-formed String Driven Thing's return to action hailed almost wholly from memories of this marvelous album. At the time, however, all seemed doom-laden. "It's a Game," although it received plenty of British airplay, went nowhere (although a hit Bay City Rollers cover later went some way toward making amends); The Machine That Cried simply died and, by the end of the year, String Driven Thing looked to have followed it, as both the Adams and Chris Wilson walked out. Stratton Smith alone was left to carry the flag, rebuilding the group around himself and newfound vocalist Kim Beacon, and soldiering on until 1975. The two albums that followed both have their place in the prog rock pantheon, but the magic had gone from the band.
It returned in the late '90s, as the Adams returned to the helm, overseeing both reissues of the band's original albums, and the preparation of new material and concerts.

More info here:
Their website



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